SS Central America, Best Seller, Ship of Gold, Treasure Ship, Ship Wreck
SS Central America, Best Seller, Ship of Gold, Treasure Ship, Ship Wreck

William Lewis Herndon, Herndon, Virginia. City History, Herndon, Virginia. Virginia Schools, Educational Booksand library publications. Lardner Gibbon and the Amazon River Valley.

SS Central America: The Final Voyage of the SS Central America, by Normand E. Klare; Lieutenant William Herndon and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon, United States Navy, The First North American Explorers of the Amazon Valley, by Normand E. Klare; Published and Distributed by Klare Taylor Publishers. Catagories: Naval library book titles - naval books, navy publications, navy history, naval history, historic events.

SS Central America.

Captain and Lieutenant William Lewis Herndon;
Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon United States Navy.

Normand Klare's Book ``The Final Voyage of the Central America" has been quoted and reviewed by many sources that can be easily found on the internet a few sites quoting Normand's writings can be found on these links:

BOOK REVIEWS Links:

San Diego Historical Society:
http://sandiegohistory.org/journal/94winter/br-final.htm

California Historical Society:
http://www.californiahistoricalsociety.org/exhibits/past_exhibits/shipofgold/story.html

B
owers and Merena QUOTED:  http://www.bowersandmerena.com/articles/article_view.chtml?artid=2875&universeid=4 94


BOOK REVIEWS and Quotes:

John H. Kimble,
Professor of History, Emeritus,
Pomona College,
Claremont, CA - 
1989:

``I can say that I found your manuscript interesting from start to finish. You have done a great job of research and organization, and I commend you on the accuracy and completeness of your account."

James M. Morris,
Newport News, Virginia -
The Northern Mariner, VOL. III, NO. 1,
January 1993:

``As a model of diligent research and lucidprose, Klares volume belongs in every maritime collection and collegiatelibrary. Laymen and scholars alike will find it a solid investment in timeand knowledge"


The Bookwatch,
 Volume 13, number 4.
1992.

"Klare's account reads almost like a novel as it uses eyewitness accounts of the survivors and Klare's research to recreate the circumstances surrounding the Central America's fate. The wreck was rediscovered in 1987: This account adds lively insights into the ships history and importance."


The Bamboo Shoots,
Hsinchu, Taiwan, Msgr.
Eugene Fahy, S.J.,
April 1992.

"The Story literally and literarily covers this gold rush steamship from stem to stern. An outstanding work of research that occupied several years in several countries."


Charles E. Herdendodrf, Ph. D,
Emeritus Professor of Oceanography,
The Ohio State University and Science Coordinator,
S.S. Central America Expedition.
March 21, 1992.

"I have just finished reading your book, The Final Voyage of the Central America 1857, and I want to tell you how much my wife Sandy and I enjoyed your work. Your research has helped fill in many of the gaps in my knowledge of the Central America ..."


Robert V. Schwemmer,
The Branding Iron, Los Angeles,
Summer 1992.

"This well done book will engage arm-chair adventurers and scholars interested in maritime history as well as those interested in colorful history of California Gold Rush era

Sandra S. Mosbacher,
Arcadia Productions, Inc.
San Francisco. July 13, 1992.

"I am returning it [the manuscript] to you [Judith Epstein, Att. at Law] with much admiration for the writer and wondering if the book has ever been published. I would love to read the entire story."


James M. Morris,
The Northern Mariner,
Newport News, VA, Vol. III, No. 1,
January 1993.

"As a model of diligent research and lucid prose, Klare's volume belongs in every maritime collection and collegiate library. Laymen and scholars alike will find it a solid investment in time and knowledge."


Harry Kelsey,
Huntington Library,
April, 1993. V. 4.

"The Author has located a great deal of biographical material. Compiled lists of passengers and crew. Located plans and sketches of the ship, and in fact done all the best treasure hunters usually do as background for their salvage efforts."


Ward McAfee,
Professor of History,
California State University.
Undated.

"Readers interested in a nineteenth - century adventure story stitched with the drama of individuals facing destruction will love this generally well-written book."


John E. Baur,
California State University, Northridge,
 Pacific Historical Review.
August 1993:

"Normand Klare has performed an excellent task in researching the lives of Herndon, his officers, and leading passengers. Among them several California gold era VIPs. Indeed, the footnotes are well worth reading as models of condensed biography..."


Alfred Lustig,
 Thiensville, WI.
July 18, 1995:

 "I thoroughly enjoyed reading your compelling account of the tragedy, and the personal background profiles of the people involved in the saga. "


Steve K. Lloyd,
 Anchorage, Alaska.
March 16, 1998:

I am a  amateur shipwreck historian and a collector of books on historic shipwrecks. I recently purchased and read you book "The Final Voyage of the Central America 1887", which I enjoyed immensely.You succeeded in describing the incredible drama of the actual sinking whileeducating the reader on the historical context of the Central America's finalvoyage. I learned more about the California Gold Rush  from your bookthan I have from any other title I have read.


David Bowers,
Bowers and Merena Galleries,
Wolfebo, NH.

November 7, 2000; November 14, 2000

"I feel as if I know you, but of course I do not. Your book is truly wonderful and I have referred to it quite a bit."

"It was truly a pleasure to talk with you. I am a great admirer of yoursimply fantastic book. Congratulations in person for a superb job, well done."

You have reached the Official Web site of Author and Historian Normand E. Klare; Author of the Final Voyage of the SS Central America and sister publication: Navy Lieutenant William Herndon and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon, United States Navy, The First North American Explorers of the Amazon Valley .  The SS Central America, alias Ship of Gold, is a true story of a tragedy at sea that documents through actualaccounts of the survivors, heroism and the despair of the crew of a doomedship.  See how a captain miles at sea and unaware of the tragedy suddenlychanges his destined course to find waves of men floating in the sea, clingingto refuge within a vast ocean. An epic true life adventure.

 Best Seller, Amazon, Books, Treasure Ships, Gold Ships, Amazon Naval             Best Seller, Amazon, Books, Treasure Ships, Gold Ships, Amazon Naval

NEW: Experience true life adventure in Normand E. Klare's new book title Lieutenant William Herndon and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon United States Navy, The First North American Explorers of the Amazon Valley" as he investigates the Amazon and studies earlier accounts of Lieutenant William Herndon's and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon's 4000 mile scientific expedition of the mysterious and treacherous Amazon, retracing their steps from their own journals he readilypresents! Be with Lieutenant Herndon as he is assigned the unusual task asa naval officer to map the Amazon River from it's source to its end in theAtlantic Ocean! Share their thoughts as they brave the altitudes of the Andesto the deep mysterious and dangerous savage filled jungles of the Amazon.


Over 20 years of research and collection of actual accounts on both subjects, including personal investigation into the Amazon himself, establishes this as an epic best seller not to be matched.

Normand E. Klare's extensive research on his title ``The Final Voyage of the SS Central America" has been quoted on virtually every book on the subject. The exhaustive research further gathered and analyzed on ``Lieutenant William Herndon and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon United States Navy, The First North American Explorers of the Amazon Valley" and displayed diaries from the actual accounts, establishes this title as a ``Great American Classic".

The first edition of ``Lieutenant William Herndon and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon United States Navy, The First North American Explorers of theAmazon Valley" is being released at this time only through the Author's ownpublishing release and also available from Barnes and Noble.

Reserve your copy today! Museums, historical societies, schools, institutions and libraries please inquire. For book packages and specials see
Klare Taylor Publishers web site.


SS Central America The Ship of Gold, Deep Blue Sea Hurricane Best Seller


The Final Voyage of the Central America
The Ship of Gold

The Voyage

CHAPTER III By Normand E. Klare

  While Captain Herndon and his crew sailed from New York, August 20, 1857, on the Central America's  forty-fourth trip, more than four hundred people in the western city of San Francisco purchased tickets for departure, the same date, on the steamship Sonora, destined for Panama and transfer to the Central America at Aspinwall. San Francisco had been several times destroyed by fire. Each reconstruction of the city saw improvement as it progressed from a city of canvas to one of wood, then to a metropolis of bricks, a thriving port city. By 1853 she was called the "Queenof the Pacific." She had 160 hotels, 18 churches, 10 schools, 3 hospitals, 14 fire companies, 19 banking firms, 13 foundries and more. Built over piles in the water were two and one-half miles of streets and twelve wharves. There were planked roads and a few of cobblestones. Around the two major public squares were a large number of elegant and substantial brick and stone buildings with such fireproofing as exterior window-shutters and doors of thick wrought-iron.   By 1854, the United States Mint had opened, streets were lighted with coal gas, and amusement parks, such as Russ' Gardens, were developed where outdoor concerts and other entertainments were enjoyed. Two omnibus lines ran to theMission district. Population pressures continued. In 1855, more than thirty-onethousand persons and eleven-hundred-fifty vessels arrived from all over theworld, leading to the establishment of over twenty-seven foreign consulatesby 1857.   And, by 1857, San Francisco proudly included severalnew buildings of respectable size, housing government, professional and businessoffices. Riddle's Building, on the south side of Clay Street, between Sansomeand Leidesdorf, housed the California Chronicle, published by FrankSoule. The Customs House Block, described as a large and elegant buildingat the southeast corner of Sansome and Sacramento 

 ``I Frank Soule, Annols of San Francisco, 494-548. John S. Hittell, History . . . of San Francisco.



































SS Central America Ship of Gold Deep Blue Sea Kinder Ship Best Seller


TO ORDER BOOKS:

First printing now available: Normand E. Klare's ``Herndon and Gibbon" The First North American Explorers of The Amazon Valley;

And Second printing of ``The Final Voyage of the Central America" Hardback Edition Available Now.


Be sure to indicate which book:
 
1.) The Voyage of the Central America or.
2.) Normand Klare's ``Herndon and Gibbon".

* Quantity orders for schools, libraries, organizations or colleges, send e-mail

Price Hardback Library Edition each is $24.95 (was 37.95) plus 4.25 S&H

Each book richly illustrated: TheFinal Voyage of the Central America with over 45 b/w historical illustrations, photographs, diaries, actual letters and accounts of passengers and crew; Herndon and Gibbon with 55 b/w historical illustrations, photographs, diaries, actual letters and accounts of the expedition; Many etchings are by Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon himself.

Sale!
 
A great gift and addition to yours or your loved ones Naval Library! Very thorough accounts!
 
Individual books can be purchased for $24.95 (was 37.95) plus $4.25 S&H each; either using Visa or Master Card on Pay Pal by clicking the Pay Pal icon.  Best selling author Normand Klare.

Please also e-mail:
admin@pacificwestcom.com to indicate which title and quantity. Book dealers inquires welcome.

See Klare Taylor Publishers web site for special book package prices!

The Final Voyage of the Central America - Hardback Library Edition # ISBN 0-97644-03-0-X .




Lieutenant William Herndon and LieutenantLardner Gibbon, US Navy - the First North American Explorers of the AmazonValley - Best Seller Hardback Library Edition #  ISBN 0-9764403-1-8 .

SEE: KLARE TAYLOR PUBLISHERS WEB SITE FOR SPECIAL PACKAGE PRICES!








Best Seller SS Central America The Ship of Gold Deep Blue Sea Hurricane


 




Best Seller, Ship of Gold, SS Central America, Deep Blue Sea, Ship Wreck

A historic travel guide of South America, Peru and Brazil: The book Herndon and Gibbon find, follow and display these countries of the world through the eyes of the explorers themselves.

By following the accounts of the explorers own journals, Normand Klare has presented insights to a wild country that even now calls the adventurous traveler.

A epic book that was derived from literally thousands of notes these explorers labored and risked life and limb to compile. Exciting  and informing, this book answers and informs the modern traveler to the culture and characteristics of the people of this wild and untamed land. Notes by the explorers and Klare, present a intriguing look at the environment and effects surrounding the rainforests that can relate to modern day impacts by man.

In High Quality Hardback Library Edition.


Now available, first printing of Normand Klare's
 

``Herndon and Gibbon"
The First North American Explorers of The Amazon Valley;


  And Second printing of ``The Final Voyage of the Central America"  Hardback edition  NOW AVAILABLE!  Limited Quantity Published.

These books in new condition are now only available from either this web site,  or the Klare Taylor Publishers main web site.

Sale Price each now $24.95 (was 37.95) plus 4.25 S&H Hardback Library Edition.


Call 541-821-3778 for Quantity orders.

 Rich b/w illustrations, photographs, diaries and actual letters accounts of passengers and crew of the SS Central America.

Google these RARE books and see what they are going for used on the internet!

A great gift and addition to yours or your loved ones Naval Library! Very thorough actual first hand accounts and in-depth history of this tragedy at sea! 

Check for special book package pricing at
Klare Taylor Publishers.

The Final Voyage of the Central America.

Herndon and Gibbon - the First North American Explorers

 





























 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Final Voyage of the
SS Central America
1857

by Normand E. Klare

The SS Central America carried 491 passengers from Panama towards New York when she was caught in a mammoth hurricane in 1857. On board was a large shipment of gold from California. .

The sinking of the SS Central America in 1857 resulted in the greatest loss of life on a commercial passenger vessel of the nineteenth century. The SS Central America sinking and loss of the ships considerable cargo of gold treasure aboard, significantly contributed  to the financial panic which subsequently rocked the United States. .

The eyewitness accounts of survivors reveal a riveting story of tragedy and heroism. Causes of the disaster, natural and human, are detailed and analyzed. Heroes and heroines are identified, and biographies of the major characters provided.

Rediscovered in 1987, the wreck is now being salvaged by the Columbus-America Discovery Group. This operation has received widespread press coverage and the artifacts will soon be exhibited.
 
 In his writings, Mr. Klare's book ``The Final Voyage of the Central America"  describes and quotes many original documents of the survivors. First published in 1992, the book was written from exhaustive research following actual written accounts of the survivors of the ill fated gold ship ``The SS Central America"  whichsank in 1857. .
 
Normand Klare's thorough research since 1976, documentation, and writing skill have resulted in an exciting, yet scholarly narrative quoted and used to construct many other later books on the subject.

A brief history of the Author:

As a World War II B -17 pilot, Normand flew, among others, 34 bombing missions over targets in Germany and France.
.

Normand continued his career in Air Force aviation as a Assistant Professor of Air Science at Arizona State University.

A thorough study and research of the events:
Best Seller.

Normand's interest in those subjects he has focused upon, came both from his interests as a historian and from family ties to those survivors of the tragedy.

Letters and diaries led Normand to spend over 20 years of research on the many varied actual accounts including travels up the Amazon himself to study and write two books that cover the travels of men that braved the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, periling heights of the Andes and treacherous jungles of the Amazon Valley.

No other books detail the personalities of these men and in-depth studyof their travels.


Recognized on the History Channel:

Most recently, Normand was interviewed by the History Channel and he can be seen and heard on their production series:

Histories Mysteries: "Ship of Gold".


Official SS Central America web site of author and historian Normand E. Klare: Author of ``The Final Voyage of the SS Central America" and ``Lieutenant William Herndon and LieutenantLardner Gibbon, United States Navy,  The First North AmericanExplorers of The Amazon Valley";

You will find no greater adventure, no greater account of human trial and accomplishment in
Lieutenant William Herndon and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon, United States Navy, The First North American Explorers of the Amazon Valley, nor greater exacting accounts of such a historic tragedy at sea than The Final Voyage of the Central America.

Though each book is complete in themselves, when buying the set, It is recommended  that you first read
Lieutenant William Herndon and LieutenantLardner Gibbon, United States Navy, the First North American Explorersof Amazon Valley" as this account fully describes the early thorough education,manner, personalities and fortitude of these men of whom you will becomeclosely and personally acquainted.

Follow then Captain Herndon's commission and events that lead to ``The Final Voyage of the SS Central America". Here you will take into account the human toll of this maritime event that is compared to as the 19th Century Titanic of its time; The sinking of the SS Central America incurring the greatest loss of life aboard a commercial passenger liner to that date.

Normand Klare's compilation of historical records, personal accounts, letters, diaries, maps, photos and historical illustrations taken from accounts of survivors is masterful"

Richard Taylor

Exhaustive Material Shows Promise for Film:

Normand's exhaustive research present such a thorough description that directors will have little problem in making a film production that will be authentic to the time, subject and human drama.

Aside from the numerous and additional unpublished notes compiled on the people of "The Final Voyage of the Central America", Normand E. Klare has compiled from his research and travels a second book title, directly relating to the lives of the people in the first book; all from factual accounts, lettersand dairies of those explorers. Lieutenant William Herndon and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon, United States Navy, The First North American Explorers of the Amazon Valley" is now complete and offers a full documentation of the lives and times of these men.


EXERTS:


"...Angelina Bowly thought that although the ladies were frightened, none lost their composure. "There was fear, but no panic..."

The Last Survivor (Black History): "...For three days and nights, Henry Johnson floated on his door, wondering whether death would come either by starvation or drowning;..."

"He had been picked up by a brig headed for "Rio Janeiro" ;... "

Of Captain Herndon he said "...he would do anything for me, and always wanted me with him..."


Over 20 years of research and collection of actual accounts on both subjects, including personal investigation into the Amazon himself, establishes this as an epic not to be matched.

Library and Museum Title Publications for schools and school libraries and private library.



MORE EXERTS:


Suters Mill and San Francisco Gold -


The Gold Rush Era - Harpers Weekly.

Ureka! Gold Found!

``It was in the first part of January, 1848, when the gold was discovered at Coloma and the adventure began, where I was then building a saw-mill. Thecontractor and builder of this mill was James W. Marshall, from New Jersey.

In the fall of 1847, after the mill seat had been located, I sent up tothis place Mr. P. L. Wimmer with his family, and a number of laborers, fromthe disbanded Mormon Battalion; and a little later I engaged Mr. Bennet from Oregon to assist Mr. Marshall in the mechanical labors of the mill. Mr. Wimmer had the team in charge, assisted by his young sons, to do the necessary teaming, and Mrs. Wimmer did the cooking for all hands.

Flower Gold: I was very much in need of a new saw-mill, to get lumber to finish my large flouring mill, of four run of stones, at Brighton, which was commenced at the same time, and was rapidly progressing; likewise for other buildings, fences, etc., for the smallvillage of Yerba Buena, (now San Francisco.) In the City Hotel, (the onlyone) at the dinner table this enterprise was unkindly called ``another follyof Sutter's," as my first settlement at the old fort near Sacramento Citywas called by a good many, ``a folly of his," and they were about right inthat, because I had the best chances to get some of the finest locations nearthe settlements; and even well stocked rancho's had been offered to me onthe most reasonable conditions; but I refused all these good offers, andpreferred to explore the wilderness, and select a territory on the banks ofthe Sacramento. It was a rainy afternoon when Mr. Marshall arrived at myoffice in the Fort, very wet. I was somewhat surprised to see him, as hewas down a few days previous; and then, I sent up to Coloma a number of teamswith provisions, mill irons, etc., etc. He told me then that he had someimportant and interesting news which he wished to communicate secretly tome, and wished me to go with him to a place where we should not be disturbed, and where no listeners could come and hear what we had to say. I went with him to my private rooms; he requested me to lock the door; I complied, but I told him at the same time that nobody was in the house except the clerk, who was in his office in a different part of the house; after requesting ofme something which he wanted, which my servants brought and then left theroom, Photograph of John Marshall, who discovered gold forgot to lock thedoors, and it happened that the door was opened by the clerk just at themoment when Marshall took a rag from his pocket, showing me the yellow metal:he had about two ounces of it; but how quick Mr. M. put the yellow metalin his pocket again can hardly be described. The clerk came to see me onbusiness, and excused himself for interrupting me, and as soon as he hadleft I was told, ``now lock the doors; didn't I tell you that we might havelisteners?" I told him that he need fear nothing about that, as it was notthe habit of this gentleman; but I could hardly convince him that he neednot to be suspicious. Then Mr. M. began to show me this metal, which consistedof small pieces and specimens, some of them worth a few dollars; he toldme that he had expressed his opinion to the laborers at the mill, that thismight be gold; but some of them were laughing at him and called him a crazyman, and could not believe such a thing.

Mining Golden Opportunity: After having proved the metal with aqua fortis, which I found in my apothecary shop, likewise with other experiments, and read the long article ``gold" in the Encyclopedia Americana, I declared this to be gold of the finest quality, of at least 23carats. After this Mr. M. had no more rest nor patience, and wanted me tostart with him immediately for Coloma; but I told him I could not leave asit was late in the evening and nearly supper time, and that it would be betterfor him to remain with me till the next morning, and I would travel withhim, but this would not do: he asked me only ``will you come to-morrow morning?"I told him yes, and off he started for Coloma in the heaviest rain, althoughalready very wet, taking nothing to eat. I took this news very easy, likeall other occurrences good or bad, but thought a great deal during the nightabout the consequences which might follow such a discovery. I gave all mynecessary orders to my numerous laborers, and left the next morning at 7o'clock, accompanied by an Indian soldier, and vaquero, in a heavy rain, forColoma. About half way on the road I saw at a distance a human being crawlingout from the brushwood. I asked the Indian who it was: he told me ``the sameman who was with you last evening." When I came nearer I found it was Marshall,very wet; I told him that he would have done better to remain with me atthe fort than to pass such an ugly night here but he told me that he wentup to Coloma, (54 miles) took his other horse and came half way to meet me;then we rode up to the new Eldorado. In the afternoon the weather was clearingup, and we made a prospecting promenade. The next morning we went to thetail-race of the mill, through which the water was running during the night,to clean out the gravel which had been made loose, for the purpose of wideningthe race; and after the water was out of the race we went in to search forgold. This was done every morning: small pieces of gold could be seen remainingon the bottom of the clean washed bed rock. I went in the race and pickedup several pieces of this gold, several of the laborers gave me some whichthey had picked up, and from Marshall I received a part. I told them thatI would get a ring made of this gold as soon as it could be done in California;and I have had a heavy ring made, with my family's coat of arms engravedon the outside, and on the inside of the ring is engraved, ``The first gold,discovered in January, 1848." Now if Mrs. Wimmer possesses a piece whichhas been found earlier than mine Mr. Marshall can tell, as it was probablyreceived from him. I think Mr. Marshall could have hardly known himself whichwas exactly the first little piece, among the whole.

Chain of events that brought the gold aboard the SS Central America:


Word of Gold gets out: The next day I went with Mr. M. on a prospecting tour in the vicinity of Coloma, and the following morning I left for Sacramento. Before my departure I had a conversation with all hands: I told them that I would consider it as a great favor if theywould keep this discovery secret only for six weeks, so that I could finishmy large flour will at Brighton, (with four run of stones,) which had costme already about from 24 to 25,000 dollars ­ the people up there promisedto keep it secret so long. On my way home, instead of feeling happy and contented,I was very unhappy, and could not see that it would benefit me much, andI was perfectly right in thinking so; as it came just precisely as I expected.I thought at the same time that it could hardly be kept secret for six weeks,and in this I was not mistaken, for about two weeks later, after my return,I sent up several teams in charge of a white man, as the teamsters were Indianboys. This man was acquainted with all hands up there, and Mrs. Wimmer toldhim the whole secret; likewise the young sons of Mr. Wimmer told him thatthey had gold, and that they would let him have some too; and so he obtaineda few dollars' worth of it as a present. As soon as this man arrived at thefort he went to a small store in one of my outside buildings, kept by Mr.Smith, a partner of Samuel Brannan, and asked for a bottle of brandy, forwhich he would pay the cash; after having the bottle he paid with these smallpieces of gold. Smith was astonished and asked him if he intended to insulthim; the teamster told him to go and ask me about it; Smith came in, in greathaste, to see me, and I told him at once the truth ­ what could I do?I had to tell him all about it. He reported it to Mr. S. Brannan, who cameup immediately to get all possible information, when he returned and sentup large supplies of goods, leased a larger house from me, and commenceda very large and profitable business; soon he opened a branch house of businessat Mormon Island.


Tax on Gold: Photograph of Sam BrannanMr. Brannan made a kind of claim on Mormon Island, and put a tolerably heavy taxon ``The Latter Day Saints." I believe it was 30 per cent, which they paidfor some time, until they got tired of it, (some of them told me that itwas for the purpose of building a temple for the honor and glory of the Lord.)

Gold Fever: So soon as the secretwas out my laborers began to leave me, in small parties first, but then allleft, from the clerk to the cook, and I was in great distress; only a fewmechanics remained to finish some very necessary work which they had commenced,and about eight invalids, who continued slowly to work a few teams, to scrape out the mill race at Brighton. The Mormons did not like to leave my mill unfinished,but they got the gold fever like everybody else. After they had made theirpiles they left for the Great Salt Lake. So long as these people have beenemployed by me they hav behaved very well, and were industrious and faithfullaborers, and when settling their accounts there was not one of them whowas not contented and satisfied.
 
Gold Rush: Then the people commenced rushing up from San Francisco and other parts of California, in May, 1848: in the former village only five men were left to take care of the women and children. The single men locked their doors and left for ``Sutter's Fort," and from there to the Eldorado. For some time the people in Monterey and farthersouth would not believe the news of the gold discovery, and said that itwas only a `Ruse de Guerre' of Sutter's, because he wanted to have neighborsin his wilderness. From this time on I got only too many neighbors, and somevery bad ones among them.
 
Desaster of Wealth: What agreat misfortune was this sudden gold discovery for me! It has just brokenup and ruined my hard, restless, and industrious labors, connected with manydangers of life, as I had many narrow escapes before I became properly established.

From my mill buildings I reaped no benefit whatever, the mill stones even have been stolen and sold.

Fortunes Lost: My tannery, which was then in a flourishing condition, and was carried on very profitably, was deserted,a large quantity of leather was left unfinished in the vats; and a greatquantity of raw hides became valueless as they could not be sold; nobodywanted to be bothered with such trash, as it was called. So it was in allthe other mechanical trades which I had carried on; all was abandoned, andwork commenced or nearly finished was all left, to an immense loss for me.Even the Indians had no more patience to work alone, in harvesting and threshingmy large wheat crop out; as the whites had all left, and other Indians hadbeen engaged by some white men to work for them, and they commenced to havesome gold for which they were buying all kinds of articles at enormous pricesin the stores; which, when my Indians saw this, they wished very much togo to the mountains and dig gold. At last I consented, got a number of wagonsready, loaded them with provisions and goods of all kinds, employed a clerk,and left with about one hundred Indians, and about fifty Sandwich Islanders(Kanakas) which had joined those which I brought with me from the Islands.The first camp was about ten miles above Mormon Island, on the south forkof the American river.

 News of Gold: In a few weeks we became crowded ,andit would no more pay, as my people made too many acquaintances. I broke upthe camp and started on the march further south, and located my next campon Sutter creek (now in Amador county), and thought that I should there bealone. The work was going on well for a while, until three or four travelinggrog-shops surrounded me, at from one and 8, half to two miles distance fromthe camp; then, of course, the gold was taken to these places, for drinking,gambling, etc., and then the following day they were sick and unable to work,and became deeper and more indebted to me, and particularly the Kanakas.I found that it was high time to quit this kind of business, and lose nomore time and money. I therefore broke up the camp and returned to the Fort,where I disbanded nearly all the people who had worked for me in the mountainsdigging gold. This whole expedition proved to be a heavy loss to me.
 
The Business of Gold: At the sametime I was engaged in a mercantile firm in Coloma, which I left in January,1849 ­ likewise with many sacrifices. After this I would have nothingmore to do with the gold affairs. At this time, the Fort was the great trading place where nearly all the business was transacted. I had no pleasure to remainthere, and moved up to Hock Farm, with all my Indians, and who had been withme from the time they were children. The place was then in charge of a MajorDomo.

Hills of Gold Abound: It is very singular that the Indians never found a piece of gold and brought it to me, as they very often did other specimens found in the ravines. I requested them continually to bring me some curiosities from the mountains, for which I always recompensed them. I have received animals, birds, plants, young trees, wild fruits, pipe clay, stones, red ochre, etc., etc., but never a piece of gold. Mr. Dana ofthe scientific corps of the expedition under Com. Wilkes' Exploring Squadron, told me that he had the strongest proof and signs of gold in the vicinity of Shasta Mountain, and furthers south. A short time afterwards, Doctor Sandels, a very scientific traveler, visited me, and explored a part of the country in a great hurry, as time would not permit him to make a longer stay.

Discovery of Gold:  He told me likewise that he found sure signs of gold, and was very sorry that be could not explore the Sierra Nevada. He did not encourage me to attempt to work and open mines, as it was uncertain how it would pay and would probably be only for a government. So I thought it more prudent to stick to the plow, not withstanding I did know that the country was rich in gold, and other minerals.An old attached Mexican servant who followed me here from the United States,as soon as he knew that I was here, and who understood a great deal aboutworking in placers, told me he found sure signs of gold in the mountains onBear Creek, and that we would go right to work after returning from our campaignin 1845, but he became a victim to his patriotism and fell into the handsof the enemy near my encampment, with dispatches for me from Gen. Micheltorena,and he was hung as a spy, for which I was very sorry.

Gold delima: By this sudden discovery of the gold, all my great plans were destroyed. Had I succeeded for a few years before the gold was discovered, I would have been the richest citizen on the Pacific shore; but it had to be different. Instead of being rich, Iam ruined, and the cause of it is the long delay of the United States Land Commission of the United States Courts, through the great influence of the squatter lawyers. Before my case will be decided in Washington, another year may elapse, but I hope that justice will be done me by the last tribunal —the Supreme Court of the United States. By the Land Commission and the DistrictCourt it has been decided in my favor. The Common Council of the city ofSacramento, composed partly of squatters, paid Adelpheus Felch, (one of thelate Land Commissioners, who was engaged by the squatters during his office),$5,000, from the fund of the city, against the will of the tax-payers, forwhich amount he has to try to defeat my just and old claim from the Mexican government, before the Supreme Court of the United States in Washington. Signatureof John Sutter. ``



Recent Developments on Recovered Gold
Promotions Present a Greater Promise:

In promotion of the gold that has been recovered from this gold ship, a replica of the ship has been built and is traveling from port to port. A promotion drive which sells the gold by the purchasers of the coins is now under way.

Book movie rights:

Should you have interest in purchasing film rights to these books, please contact, Richard Taylor, acting agent forNormand Klare, at 541-821-3778; or e-mail me admin@pacificwestcom.com.  A meeting with Mr. Klare to discuss this option can be arranged.

Library and Museum Title Publications by
Klare Taylor Publishers.

 

SS Central America, Best Seller, Ship of Gold, Treasure Ship, Ship Wreck

SS Central America, Best Seller: The Final Voyage of the SS Central America, by Normand E. Klare; Lieutenant William Herndon and Lieutenant Lardner Gibbon, United States Navy, The First North American Explorers of the Amazon Valley, by NormandE. Klare; Best Seller Published and Distributed by Klare Taylor Publishers.


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Green Springs Character License21 Jim, Jethro, John, Jesse, Josh, Jeff, Jamie, Joseph, Jake, Justin andJoey Johnson in Jerboa Juneberry, Jelly Berry Jam Jamboree.


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Green Springs Character License23 Lu Lu Llama and Lorilie Llama in Limes, Lemons and Llamas.


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